Dissociative Identity Disorders and Trauma: GRCC Psychology Lecture




Presented by Colin A. Ross, MD.

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Dissociative Identity Disorders and Trauma: GRCC Psychology Lecture

Comments 41

  1. Wouldn't it be better to set up the argument in favor of and against DID along with the evidence used to support them before simply taking one side. After all, if your position is as strong as you say it is, that's all you have to do. Compare the evidence and arguments fairly and fully. The right conclusion becomes clear. Everyone learns.

    I wish there was a convicing argument somewhere in this talk. Most of his reasoning is good, but his evidence is weak. And this business about claiming that other psychiatric/psychological professionals has repressed/suppressed childhood trauma and therefore don't want to talk about it is … well, totally childish and unprofessional. Diagnosing your intellectual opponents is a breach of ethics and, frankly, just a very cheap, unconvincing rhetorical ploy.

  2. The Holy Spirit revealed to me that I had multiple personality disorder after I accepted Jesus as my Lord and Savior. I spent years searching for answers in eastern religion and the occult and I witnessed insanity, suicides and even murder. I have heard voices in my head my entire life but God has been integrating and healing my mind and my heart. My testimony is posted on my YouTube channel.

  3. it's getting late so will watch later, but according to the comments I look forward to it. In the late 80s I was a case manager at a community mental health center and my office mate and I tried to get trauma related disorders accepted. But every psychiatrist I worked with there and later believed DID was real but so rare that they'd never see it. Then I moved to another state and ended up finding someone there who was DID. I questioned his diagnosis and finally got the state hospital to accept him on in-patient after listening to my explanation of what I recognized being with him. They called the very next day and told me they agreed with me and would I please go get him as they don't treat DID. He'd been a client since he'd been a teen, and before that a client elsewhere since he was 2. I felt I needed to stay around to try and help him because I was the reason he had no support. We were together for ~10 years- and we gave up counting the alters. They were coming out in clusters after while about 5 or more. At first they were crying babies, and they grew up quick with nurturing. But then they came as angry teenagers and I had to leave for my own safety. I've written a book (actually several books), but haven't had the stability to get anything published. Eventually, my memories surfaced and I accept the diagnosis of C-PTSD. (Was bipolar until we found a blood pressure pill did more for me than anything typical for bipolar.)

    You are right- it is NOT rare! Since then I've met several DIDs- in various situations and all very different. I founded a non-profit SEASCAT for adult survivors of child abuse to help people understand the struggles. My biography is titled The True Story of a Malingerer. He is still around and we occasionally talk- but someone else is in charge of his system and we barely know each other. I need to go to bed- I'm at the part where you're comparing BPD and DID. They are not even close in behavior, in my experience. I've had a few people try to suggest I was BPD but I've never enough of the criteria at any one time. C-PTSD. still not in the DSM fits me perfectly.

  4. May i just say, that is so right – its depression/schizophrenia/identity disorder <non specific> and the drugs don't work/ have harmful side effects, ignore their social position and childhood trauma. Sometimes just get a couple of bottles of cheap cider and empty them – that sometimes is so much better if not done very often – twice a year – because you can get rid of some dark feelings and whose to say anti depressants do a better job ? Identity disorder people have terrible memories, so right. I focus of golf and that is way way better than counselling and pills. You look at John Daly (American golfer) violent father, drinks heavily like his dad when he was younger (but not now). I was like him. I see it now.

  5. I'm preparing a presentation regarding social worker burnout and client childhood trauma, and how the two things interact with each other. I know that my information about the relationship between unresolved trauma and most behavioral pathologies will be challenged by some professionals, and this lecture has given me the ammunition that I need, in order to fight the nay-sayers.

  6. Make sure you look at both sides and research this guy, Colin A. Ross. He has some pages that look legit but also a history of horror stories from patients who were clearly misdiagnosed and neglected to fit what he wanted them to be. It makes no sense that this guy would constantly accidentally run into so many people with multiple personalities early in his career. He would drug them and blame the effects on personality switching and Satanic cults. He also thinks he can control people with his mind.

  7. 1:25:20. Wow. I remember saying this to my mom in my teens, that I thought maybe I was subconsciously keeping myself overweight, because maybe then men wouldn’t be interested in me.

    I feel like I haven’t even heard this idea again until now, like 25 years later.

    Damn if that didn’t punch me right in my huge gut..

  8. this man is a malpractitioner. please google him. read about the lawsuits against him and how he claimed to shoot energy beams out of his eyes. make your own mind. whether did is a real diagnosis or not, this man does not deserve to be given any credit.

  9. Some people are possessed, and that is very common, but Drs don't want to believe that. Well Jesus cast them out a lot back in his days of ministry. So did the disciples. I met one person who was possessed, and even moved things! Never again! It was not a mental illness, it definitely was demonic.

    But this is educational. My friend had DID, and is BiPolar. but she is doing well on her meds now. She had a lot of sexual, emotional, and physical abuse! I'll be sending her this video for sure. Thank you so much. 5/2019

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